Chinook Wawa

Your Chinook Wawa Word of the Day: Stick

In a “stick illahee” (forest) one could easily find both "mitwhit stick" (a standing tree) and “whim stick” (a fallen tree), as well as the occasional “koko stick” (wood-pecker)....

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Your Chinook Wawa Word of the Day: Klootchman

Historically, “klootchman” only referred to a First Nations adult woman, unless combined with another word, such as “Kingchauch klootchman” (Englishwoman) “Boston klootchman” (American woman), or some other descriptor, such as “tenas klootchman” (girl; young woman)....

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Your Chinook Wawa Word of the Day: Potlatch

The potlatch was the ceremonial distribution of property and gifts practiced among the First Nations of Cascadia along the Pacific coast, particularly the Kwakiutl, and were an institutional foundation of coastal society and economics....

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Your Chinook Wawa Word of the Day: Snass

SNASS [snas] or [snaws] — noun. Meaning: Rain. Origin: Chinook Jargon; From unknown origin, likely a manufactured onomatopoeia. A highly expressive word for rain, “snass” is said to have rhymed with “moss”, and is the foundation for many Chinook Wawa words and expression regarding meteorological activity. One can inform another that…...

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Your Chinook Wawa Word of the Day: Mahsie

MAHSIE [MAH-sie] — verb. Meaning: Thanks, thank you, thankful. Origin: French, merci  thank you. Sometimes rendered as ‘masi’, ‘mausie’ and even as “masiem”, the world was adopted from French as a way of saying ‘thanks’ or ‘thank you”, or to show that one is ‘thankful’, “wawa mahsie” ( to give…...

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Your Chinook Wawa Word of the Day: Skookum

Our word of the Day this week is Skookum! One of the most versatile words in Chinook Jargon....

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Demonstrating Cascadia Decolonization – Recognizing Indigenous History

In this brief essay, contributor Trevor Owen outlines a decolonization strategy he learned while living in Australia. The practice of starting meetings down under with a “Welcome to Country” intro and sometimes presentation shifts the focus towards indigenous power and place....

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